Carpio-Morales: ‘Someday, this nation will reap its bountiful harvest’

May 20, 2019

Former Ombudsman and Supreme Court Associate Justice Conchita Carpio-Morales graced the halls of the Ateneo Law School (ALS) last Friday, May 17, to speak at the 2019 ALS Legal Ethics Symposium, an annual forum for discussing current and emerging issues in legal ethics, organized by sophomore law school students.

This year, it is entitled “Panatang Makabayan: Tungkulin ba ng Abogado na Ibigin ang Pilipinas?” and Carpio-Morales shared her views on the role that love of country and nationalism play in the Filipino lawyer’s legal ethics and professional responsibility.


 

ALS Dean Jose Maria G. Hofileña welcomed students and guests to the forum. He opined that there is indeed importance in asking whether or not it is the lawyer’s role to love his or her country.

Lalong-lalo na sa mga kapanahunang kasalukuyan kung saan marahil atin ding tinatanong kung minamahal din ba tayo ng ating bayan (Especially in times like now when we ask if our country loves us back),” he said.

“What keeps the law afloat is the buoyancy of legal ethics,” she said. “I would like to believe that despite the evolution of almost everything, one prevailing value in the Philippines is the love of country.”

Carpio-Morales mentioned the landmark case filed with the International Criminal Court regarding crimes committed within Philippine territory as an example of upholding the rule of law. “Before the effectivity of the withdrawal of the President from the ICC, our team went to The Hague and filed the information with the office of the prosecutor,” she said.

She added, “Someday, this nation will reap its bountiful harvest. The youth must be initiated in the fundamentals of civic duty and good governance at the earliest possible time.”

“We cannot alter the past, but we can alert for the future,” said Carpio-Morales to the young law students at the forum.

Atty. Axel Rupert Cruz, Director of the Ateneo Legal Services Center, and Renz Ayongao, a sophomore student, served as reactors to Carpio-Morales’ address. “As lawyers, how do we love our country?” asked Cruz. “Not just by sharing posts, but by being true to our oath. Remember your oath when you become lawyers.”

For Ayongao, he posed questions to fellow students. “As students, what is our appreciation of international law, especially with regard to the communication filed with the ICC? What do we make of the situation in the ICC? What should we make of all these?”

Cruz (left) and Ayongao (right) shared their reactions to Carpio Morales’ address.

He also talked about the role that social media plays in being a platform for political activism. “We feel guilty that we don't do enough,” Ayongao said, “We should not be too strict on what we can do at the moment. Reacting on social media already does something for the nation. If one person could read it, it already has an effect.”

This year's symposium was co-sponsored by ALS Block 2021-A, the Teehankee Center, the Ateneo Society of International Law, and the Environmental Law Society of Ateneo.

News Archive

  • Carpio-Morales: ‘Someday, this nation will reap its bountiful harvest’
    Monday, May 20, 2019

    Former Ombudsman and Supreme Court Associate Justice Conchita Carpio-Morales graced the halls of the Ateneo Law School (ALS) last Friday, May 17, to speak at the 2019 ALS Legal Ethics Symposium, an annual forum for discussing current and emerging issues in legal ethics, organized by sophomore law school students.

    This year, it is entitled “Panatang Makabayan: Tungkulin ba ng Abogado na Ibigin ang Pilipinas?” and Carpio-Morales shared her views on the role that love of country and nationalism play in the Filipino lawyer’s legal ethics and professional responsibility.


     

    ALS Dean Jose Maria G. Hofileña welcomed students and guests to the forum. He opined that there is indeed importance in asking whether or not it is the lawyer’s role to love his or her country.

    Lalong-lalo na sa mga kapanahunang kasalukuyan kung saan marahil atin ding tinatanong kung minamahal din ba tayo ng ating bayan (Especially in times like now when we ask if our country loves us back),” he said.

    “What keeps the law afloat is the buoyancy of legal ethics,” she said. “I would like to believe that despite the evolution of almost everything, one prevailing value in the Philippines is the love of country.”

    Carpio-Morales mentioned the landmark case filed with the International Criminal Court regarding crimes committed within Philippine territory as an example of upholding the rule of law. “Before the effectivity of the withdrawal of the President from the ICC, our team went to The Hague and filed the information with the office of the prosecutor,” she said.

    She added, “Someday, this nation will reap its bountiful harvest. The youth must be initiated in the fundamentals of civic duty and good governance at the earliest possible time.”

    “We cannot alter the past, but we can alert for the future,” said Carpio-Morales to the young law students at the forum.

    Atty. Axel Rupert Cruz, Director of the Ateneo Legal Services Center, and Renz Ayongao, a sophomore student, served as reactors to Carpio-Morales’ address. “As lawyers, how do we love our country?” asked Cruz. “Not just by sharing posts, but by being true to our oath. Remember your oath when you become lawyers.”

    For Ayongao, he posed questions to fellow students. “As students, what is our appreciation of international law, especially with regard to the communication filed with the ICC? What do we make of the situation in the ICC? What should we make of all these?”

    Cruz (left) and Ayongao (right) shared their reactions to Carpio Morales’ address.

    He also talked about the role that social media plays in being a platform for political activism. “We feel guilty that we don't do enough,” Ayongao said, “We should not be too strict on what we can do at the moment. Reacting on social media already does something for the nation. If one person could read it, it already has an effect.”

    This year's symposium was co-sponsored by ALS Block 2021-A, the Teehankee Center, the Ateneo Society of International Law, and the Environmental Law Society of Ateneo.