Teehankee Center launches centenary lecture series

September 12, 2018
By: 
Myreen C. Raginio
By Myreen C. Raginio

To be critical is not equivalent to automatically being in the opposition. To be critical requires a careful examination of the subject of scrutiny and a determination of its good and bad points. As the great thinker Immanuel Kant once said, “Sapere aude!” Dare to know. This is why the Teehankee Center for the Rule of Law has launched its Lecture Series, the first being on the Proposed Federal Constitution – to apprise the people of what they are up against so the opinions they form will not be baseless.
 


 
Presently, there is no doubt as to the sensitivity of the people when it comes to the Proposed Federal Constitution. Many have already made a stand as to whether to be for or against it, but it is important to remember that before forming any opinions on the matter, one must be fully informed of such first and foremost. 
In keeping with its role as a forum for informative, credible, and healthy discourses, the Center held the first installment of the CJCT Centenary Lecture Series in the Ateneo Law School on August 28, 2018. Gracing the event as the keynote speaker was Retired Associate Justice Antonio Eduardo Nachura, member of President Rodrigo Duterte’s Charter Change Consultative Committee. 
 
The guests were welcomed by Dean Jose Maria G. Hofileña who reminisced on his own thoughts and experience during the Consultations for the 1987 Constitution.  Then, in an hour and a half, Retired Justice Nachura supplied the attending guests and law students with an overview of the Proposed Federal Constitution. 
 
The changes in the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial branches of the government, as well as the nuances on the National Territory, the Bill of Rights, and the Constitutional Commissions, were among those introduced and discussed by the Retired Justice. One of the bolder proposals is the vesting of the power of revision - not just amendment - to the people when it comes to the fundamental law of the land. 
 

 
After the discussion, the floor was opened for questions and clarifications. Many curious students raised their own worries and doubts as to the changes being proposed such as the inclusion of the minimum requirement of being a holder of a College Degree or its equivalent to those running for Congress and the Presidency and Vice Presidency. These questions were met with objectivity by esteemed Retired Justice Nachura. He not only shared the ‘why’ of the provisions, but also the ‘how’ of the proposals. Through these interactions, a more vivid picture of the birth of the Proposed Federal Constitution was generated.
 
The lecture on August 28 is only the first of the series. A second one will be coming later in the year, endeavoring to once more provide sufficient and credible information to guide the views and opinions of not only the students of the Ateneo Law School, but all who are willing to know.

News Archive

  • Teehankee Center launches centenary lecture series
    Wednesday, September 12, 2018
    By Myreen C. Raginio

    To be critical is not equivalent to automatically being in the opposition. To be critical requires a careful examination of the subject of scrutiny and a determination of its good and bad points. As the great thinker Immanuel Kant once said, “Sapere aude!” Dare to know. This is why the Teehankee Center for the Rule of Law has launched its Lecture Series, the first being on the Proposed Federal Constitution – to apprise the people of what they are up against so the opinions they form will not be baseless.
     


     
    Presently, there is no doubt as to the sensitivity of the people when it comes to the Proposed Federal Constitution. Many have already made a stand as to whether to be for or against it, but it is important to remember that before forming any opinions on the matter, one must be fully informed of such first and foremost. 
    In keeping with its role as a forum for informative, credible, and healthy discourses, the Center held the first installment of the CJCT Centenary Lecture Series in the Ateneo Law School on August 28, 2018. Gracing the event as the keynote speaker was Retired Associate Justice Antonio Eduardo Nachura, member of President Rodrigo Duterte’s Charter Change Consultative Committee. 
     
    The guests were welcomed by Dean Jose Maria G. Hofileña who reminisced on his own thoughts and experience during the Consultations for the 1987 Constitution.  Then, in an hour and a half, Retired Justice Nachura supplied the attending guests and law students with an overview of the Proposed Federal Constitution. 
     
    The changes in the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial branches of the government, as well as the nuances on the National Territory, the Bill of Rights, and the Constitutional Commissions, were among those introduced and discussed by the Retired Justice. One of the bolder proposals is the vesting of the power of revision - not just amendment - to the people when it comes to the fundamental law of the land. 
     

     
    After the discussion, the floor was opened for questions and clarifications. Many curious students raised their own worries and doubts as to the changes being proposed such as the inclusion of the minimum requirement of being a holder of a College Degree or its equivalent to those running for Congress and the Presidency and Vice Presidency. These questions were met with objectivity by esteemed Retired Justice Nachura. He not only shared the ‘why’ of the provisions, but also the ‘how’ of the proposals. Through these interactions, a more vivid picture of the birth of the Proposed Federal Constitution was generated.
     
    The lecture on August 28 is only the first of the series. A second one will be coming later in the year, endeavoring to once more provide sufficient and credible information to guide the views and opinions of not only the students of the Ateneo Law School, but all who are willing to know.