Transitional Justice and Internal Displacement: What exists and what are the gaps?

September 30, 2019

In celebration of Philippine National Law Week, Ateneo Law School alumna Atty. Cecilia Jimenez-Damary gave a public lecture entitled  “Transitional Justice and Internal Displacement: What Exists and What Are the Gaps?” last September 20. The Philippines is one of the countries with the highest number of internally displaced persons in the world, and in the past few years there have been bills introduced in Congress on protecting rights of IDPs, although none have been passed into law. In her talk, Atty. Jimenez-Damary shared that the average duration of internal displacement is 20 years, and most those affected live either in camps or in villages.

 
Atty. Cecilia Jimenez-Damary

From a transitional justice framework, Atty. Jimenez-Damary gave recommendations on how the state and policymakers can address and protect the rights of IDPs. First is through prevention, which characterizes the duty of the state to, as much as possible, to address root causes of displacement.  Another is by offering durable solutions, which go beyond humanitarian assistance, but targeted towards addressing discrimination, promoting access to justice, providing a system of reparations, participation, and aid to help in transition back to normal conditions.  With a human rights lens, lessons from other countries’ transitional justice models may help in crafting policies and programs.

At the end of the forum, she quoted one of Dr. Jose Rizal’s famous sayings, in relation to IDP and transitional justice in the Philippine context: “ang hindi lumingon sa pinangalingan ay hindi makakarating sa paroroonan.” Learning from past experiences, challenges and good practices of other countries provide valuable, even life-saving insight to the Philippines in promoting and protecting the rights of IDPs in the Philippines.

Atty. Cecilia Jimenez-Damary is the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Internally Displaced Persons. Prior to her post, she was the government representative to the Transitional Justice and Reconciliation Commission  (TJRC) which implemented the transition provisions of the Comprehensive Agreement on the Bangsamoro (CAB).
 

News Archive

  • Transitional Justice and Internal Displacement: What exists and what are the gaps?
    Monday, September 30, 2019

    In celebration of Philippine National Law Week, Ateneo Law School alumna Atty. Cecilia Jimenez-Damary gave a public lecture entitled  “Transitional Justice and Internal Displacement: What Exists and What Are the Gaps?” last September 20. The Philippines is one of the countries with the highest number of internally displaced persons in the world, and in the past few years there have been bills introduced in Congress on protecting rights of IDPs, although none have been passed into law. In her talk, Atty. Jimenez-Damary shared that the average duration of internal displacement is 20 years, and most those affected live either in camps or in villages.

     
    Atty. Cecilia Jimenez-Damary

    From a transitional justice framework, Atty. Jimenez-Damary gave recommendations on how the state and policymakers can address and protect the rights of IDPs. First is through prevention, which characterizes the duty of the state to, as much as possible, to address root causes of displacement.  Another is by offering durable solutions, which go beyond humanitarian assistance, but targeted towards addressing discrimination, promoting access to justice, providing a system of reparations, participation, and aid to help in transition back to normal conditions.  With a human rights lens, lessons from other countries’ transitional justice models may help in crafting policies and programs.

    At the end of the forum, she quoted one of Dr. Jose Rizal’s famous sayings, in relation to IDP and transitional justice in the Philippine context: “ang hindi lumingon sa pinangalingan ay hindi makakarating sa paroroonan.” Learning from past experiences, challenges and good practices of other countries provide valuable, even life-saving insight to the Philippines in promoting and protecting the rights of IDPs in the Philippines.

    Atty. Cecilia Jimenez-Damary is the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Internally Displaced Persons. Prior to her post, she was the government representative to the Transitional Justice and Reconciliation Commission  (TJRC) which implemented the transition provisions of the Comprehensive Agreement on the Bangsamoro (CAB).