Undergrad Electives

1ST Semester SY 2017-2018

 
 

LIT 112.1 CLASSICAL TO MODERN LITERARY CRITICISM
MWF, 2:00-3:00pm (For Lit Majors Only)
Dr. Jocelyn Martin
This class is an introduction to literary criticism from five Western periods: the Classical Age, the Middle Ages and the Rennaissance, the Age of Enlightenment, the Romantic Period, and the Modern Age.
 
LIT 126.1 WESTERN LITERATURE I: THE ANCIENT WORLD TO THE RENAISSANCE
Section A –     WED, 5:00-8:00pm (Lit Majors Only)
                         Dr. Vincenz Serrano
Section B –     MWF, 3:00-4:00pm
                         Dr. Edward-David Ruiz
Section C –     MWF, 4:00-5:00pm
                         Ms. Ma. Gabriela Martin
A survey of the literature of the Western World produced between the 10th century BC and the late 17th century, including representative poetry, drama, prose fiction, and non-fiction from the Ancient World, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance.
 
LIT 127.1 THIRD WORLD LITERATURE I
Section A –      MWF, 4:00-5:00pm (Lit Majors Only)
                          Mr. Maximino Pulan, Jr.
Section B –      MWF, 2:00-3:00pm
                          Mr. Louie Jon Sanchez
Section C –      TTH, 12:00-1:30pm
                          Ms. Annette Soriano
A survey of African, Asian, and Latin American literature from antiquity to the 1700’s, focusing on works selected primarily for their ability to illustrate the strong influence of colonialism.
 
LIT 136/FA-CW 101.2: WRITING WORKSHOP: FICTION
TUE, 5:00-8:00pm (4 slots only)
Mr. Alexis Augusto Abola
This is a workshop course where original works of students are critically discussed in small and large groups under the guidance of an instructor who is an accomplished fictionist. Topics pertinent to the students’ development as writers will be discussed, specifically why they write and what they hope to achieve by writing. The process encourages philosophical reflection for which theory and poetics will be re/introduced.
 
LIT 138/FA-CW 102.2 CREATIVE WRITING III: NON-FICTION
Section A -      TH, 6:30-9:30pm (4 slots only)
                         Mr. Carljoe Javier
Section B -      FRI, 1:00-4:00pm(4 slots only)
                         Mr. Martin Villanueva
LIT 138 is a creative writing workshop conducted under the direction of a guest writer. The course guides the writing of, discusses, and analyzes the students’ original works of non-fiction such as personal essays, journals, and travelogues.
 
LIT 161.1: LITERATURE AND IDEAS I: VIOLENCE IN MARCOSIAN FICTION
MWF, 10:00-11:00am
Dr. John Labella
Residues of violence seep through narratives about life under the Marcos regime. In this course students close-read short stories and novels, focusing on state-promoted violence as a problem for philosophy and literary representation. The problem is that state violence not only warps self-other relations. It also alters the means upon which storytellers rely to restore human sense to dying and survival. This course responds to the nostalgia and amnesiac revisionism currently framing the Philippines’ totalitarian past. Against the perils of forgetting, the truth of fiction offers a possible antidote.
 
LIT 165 PHILIPPINE NOVEL IN ENGLISH
MWF, 2:00-3:00pm
Mr. Glenn Diaz
A survey of the Philippine novel in English from the Spanish regime to the present, including works by Rizal, Nolledo, Dalisay, Jose, and Santos.
 
LIT 189 EUROPEAN LITERATURE
TTH, 8:00-9:30am
Dr. Hidde Van Der Wall
An introduction to the major European writers from the Ancient World to postmodernist times.
 
LIT 191.7 THE DEVELOPMENT OF FICTION
SAT, 8:00-11:00am
Mr. Danilo Francisco Reyes
A reading course on representative fictionists and their selected novels and short stories. It presents a historic-literary survey of major issues in fiction studies and the fundamental debates, arguments, problems, and achievements in this genre.
 
LIT 192.2/FA 103.2: CREATIVE WRITING II: POETRY
MWF, 11:00-12:00nn (4 slots only)
Mr. Danilo Francisco Reyes
This is a workshop course where original works of students are critically discussed in small and large groups under the guidance of an instructor who is an accomplished poet. Topics pertinent to the students’ development as writers will be discussed, specifically why they write and what they hope to achieve by writing. The process encourages philosophical reflection for which theory and poetics will be re/introduced.
 
LIT 192.6/FA 136.1: THE DEVELOPMENT OF DRAMA
TTH, 11:00-12:30nn (4 slots only)
Mr. Glenn Mas
An introduction to playwrights and representative plays from Classical Antiquity to the Contemporary era. Works by the likes of Sophocles, Kiyotsugu, Marlowe, Shakepeare, Moliere, Ibsen, Shaw, Beckett, Duras, and David Henry Huang are discussed, taking into account the theatrical and symbolic aspects of the plays.
 
LIT 193.22/FA 190.2: SHAKESPEARE IN THEATER
TTH, 12:30-2:00pm (4 slots only)
Mr. Miguel Antonio Luarca
Study of Shakespeare's plays in performance. Subjects include the theatrical dynamics and production of selected plays in Shakespeare's playhouse and the theatrical and cultural study of significant productions in selected periods, such as modernism and postmodernism.
 
LIT 193.23/FA 114.2: WRITING SEMINAR: DRAMA
TH, 2:00-5:00pm (4 slots only)
Mr. Glenn Mas
This is a workshop course where original works of students are critically discussed in small and large groups under the guidance of an instructor who is an accomplished playwright. Topics pertinent to the students’ development as writers will be discussed, specifically why they write and what they hope to achieve by writing. The process encourages philosophical reflection for which theory and poetics will be re/introduced.
 
LIT 193.37: LITERATURE AND IDEAS III: THE PHILIPPINE TELESERYE
MWF, 9:00-10:00am
Mr. Louie Jon A. Sanchez
This course explores the contemporary soap opera called the “teleserye” in Philippine television in contemporary times. Using cultural studies and media studies frameworks, the exploration is historical, poetic, and aesthetic in nature, and explicates the development of the genre as it was practiced, defined (and re-defined) in the last 30 years, beginning with the return of democratized Philippine television after the 1986 Edsa Revolution, until the most recent "Korean turn." This course is designed for literature majors and minors who wish to engage in Filipino popular cultural texts and communication majors aiming to deepen their understanding of the genre.
 
LIT 193.40: LITERATURE AND IDEAS III: NAVIGATING SEA TEXTS: A CRITICAL COMPARATIVE SURVEY OF MARITIME LITERATURE
TH, 5:00-8:00pm
Ms. Maria Natividad Karaan
The sea is a wellspring of imagination—it is troped as passage and abyss, bountiful and deserted, pacific and catastrophic. However, these conceptions of the sea are overwhelmingly dominated by Western and terra/torial discourse, ignoring other modes of knowing that may consider the sea otherwise. In this course, the tropicality of the sea is navigated through a survey of texts across cultures from antiquity to contemporary to reveal the counterpoints of maritime geopoetics. Through this, the concept of navigation is explored as trope and method: a way of moving through the aquatic and a way of moving through texts.