Graduate Course Electives

Our graduate electives are designed to allow graduate students every opportunity to engage the primary texts of important thinkers in the history of philosophy. The Department believes that every student is an apprentice to the great philosophers and so we give them courses that will allow them that apprenticeship. To give a broader perspective on the issues and history of philosophy, the faculty offers thematic courses on certain problematics of the discipline or vital themes that demand deeper exploration.
 

Graduate Courses – First Semester 2016-2017 
 
PH 200 METHODS OF RESEARCH
PH 301 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN PHILOSPHY
RAFTERY-SKEHAN, MARK MICHAEL JO
Mondays 1800-2100 CTC-103 
This course furnishes the student with the practical skills necessary to produce rigorous scholarly writing in philosophy. Skills covered range from identifying and delimiting a topic to editing a final draft, from clear exposition to incisive critique, from writing abstracts to adhering to styles of academic apparatus. Selected recent debates in continental philosophy allow us to retrace a chain of philosophical texts that respond and refer to one another, and serve as a shared body of material for identifying various research and writing skills as they are exemplarily practised. Over the course of a step-by-step procedure covering the research, writing and editing phases, each student is guided toward the production of an academic article.
 
PH 226.1 PHILO PERSPECTIVES: SEMINAR IN ETHICAL THEORIES
PH 303 ADVANCED THEORIES IN ETHICS


PRINCIPE, JESUS DEOGRACIAS

Wednesdays 1800-2100 CTC-308

In this course on advanced theories in ethics, we will discuss 
the specific topic in contemporary ethical discourse on supererogation, i.e., the idea that there is a category of acts considered good which are “beyond the call of duty”. We will look at the seminal essay by J.O. Urmson, and identify the contours of the subsequent debate. In doing so, we will be able to see how what is at stake is not only a peculiar concept, but a calling into question of the three major traditional ethical theories: virtue, deontological, and consequentialist ethics. 

PH 202 THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE 
RODRIGUEZ, AGUSTIN MARTIN
Tuesdays and Thursdays 1700-1830 CTC-408 
The course will expose students to the foundational questions of epistemology and show how the epistemological problem stated in modernity may find a meaningful response in contemporary philosophy. Starting with the basic questions of Hume and Kant, the course will demonstrate how we can formulate a response to their problematic from the insights of Marion and Derrida. We will attempt to formulate a new way of thinking about knowing which allows for the opening to the play of what comes to presence. The course’s objective is to help the students read a particular epistemological problematic and rethink this from the works of contemporary thinkers. It should also help them to formulate their own research agenda regarding the philosophy of knowing.
 
PH 234 & PH 320.16 HEIDEGGER

BARBAZA, REMMON

Schedule: TBA [to be arranged by the participants involved on the initial meeting]

Philo. Dept. 
This is an intensive reading course of key works of Heidegger, from the fundamental ontology of Sein und Zeit [Being and Time] (1927) to his confrontation with the modern technological world in Gelassenheit [Discourse on Thinking] (1955) as well as his reflections on language, notably in Unterwegs zur Sprache [On The Way to Language] (1959). The selection of texts reflects the development of Heidegger’s thinking, even as one discerns a single thought to which the thinker attends. Among the key concepts to be studied are being, duality of being, Dasein, phenomenology, being-in-the-world, being towards death, dwelling, poetry, language, modern technology, “enframing,” Gelassenheit and Ereignis.
 
PH 227.4 PHILOSOPHICAL TOPICS: COSMOLOGY (PHILOSOPHY OF NATURE) & PH 330.9 PHILOSOPHY OF NATURE

DE SCHRIJVER, GEORGES, SJ

Thursdays and Fridays 1800-2100 
FROM SEPTEMBER 1 TO OCTOBER 21, 2016 
Philo. Dept. 
The course gives an overview of the cosmologies that were in vogue in: 1) antiquity - the Jewish and Christian concepts of creation; 2) and the classical thinkers in cosmology - Plato, Aristotle, and Ptolemy; 3) and in modern times - Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler and Newton. It makes the students acquainted with the scientific innovations inaugurated by Einstein, and the specialists in quantum physics and astrophysics, as well as with the 'big bang' theory and its newest developments. It attempts at sensitizing the students to the cosmic evolution of which we are part.
 
for inquiries, please contact Jade Principe at jprincipe@ateneo.edu 

UNDERGRADUATE ELECTIVES 
THAT ARE OF POSSIBLE INTEREST TO M.A. STUDENTS 
 
PH 116 HISTORY OF IDEAS: WESTERN II (MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY)

ROSARIO, JR., TOMAS

Tuesdays and Thursdays 1400-1530 CTC-203
 
PH 118 HISTORY OF IDEAS: WESTERN IV (CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY)

TAN, JEAN EMILY
Tuesdays and Thursdays 1230-1400 B-103 

PH 132 METAPHYSICS

HERMIDA, RANILO

Tuesdays and Thursdays 1530-1700 CTC-107