Course Offerings

UNDERGRADUATE ECO ELECTIVES FOR FIRST SEMESTER SY 2018-2019

 
EC 113 ECONOMICS OF MONEY AND BANKING
MWF, 3:00 – 4:00 pm, SOM203 (Section A)
Mr. Edwin E. Yaptangco
Pre-requisite: EC 102 and EC 112
Course Description: Systematic treatment of monetary theory and practice such as the determinants of money supply and the volume of credit.  Economic analysis of financial markets (bond, stock, foreign exchange) and financial institutions in the Philippines and other countries as they affect general economic activity.  Institutions to be studied include central banks, commercial banks, investment funds and selected related financial institutions such as insurance companies, rural banks and agricultural credit cooperatives.
 
EC 122 INTERNATIONAL TRADE
TTH, 11:00 – 12:30 pm, CTC 406 (Section A)
TTH, 12:30 – 2:00 pm, SOM 204 (Section B)
Dr. Marissa Maricosa A. Paderon
Pre-requisite: EC 102 and EC 111
Course Description: This course introduces international trade theory and policy. Topics include a systematic treatment of traditional comparative advantage theory and new trade theory based on economies of scale. Emphasis is on the importance of the foreign exchange market using the asset approach to exchange rate determination.
 
EC 159 ECONOMICS OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT
TUE, 5:00 – 8:00 pm, K 201 (Section A)
Dr. Germelino M. Bautista
Pre-requisite: EC 102 and EC111
Course Description: This course in Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (ENRE) initially integrates the basic environmental (production, regulation, and habitat-carrier) functions, the commons and property-rights matrix, and the valuation or quantification of ecosystem, natural resource and economic conditions within an environmental economic accounting system. The newly established 2011 System of Environmental Economic Accounts (SEEA) serves not only as a classification and accounting system that would tabulate and monitor the baseline business-as-usual (BAU) conditions of the economy and environment. Together with available environmental economic theories and methodologies, SEEA may also function as an analytical and evaluative framework that can help determine the trajectory outcomes of the BAU scenario, which in turn may suggest the management policies and intervention measures and programs to undertake. 
 
Specifically, the SEEA baseline conditions account the existing natural capital stocks and the flows of both the renewable and the potentially depletive and exhaustible natural resource supplies at the given level of demand, together with the current state of ecosystem habitats, environmental services, waste and pollution, temperature, precipitation patterns and frequency of tropical cyclones. When the natural resource stock and ecosystem interface with current market and demographic conditions and the projected impact of present economic, environment, energy and other policies, SEEA would record the trajectory of the local-national economy, ecosystems and prospective conditions of the commons. Accounting with either qualitative indices or physical and monetary values, SEEA would indicate the degree of ecosystem resiliency and resource sustainability, as well as evaluate the costs of resource depletion and the degradation of ecosystem habitats and environmental services. With these values, SEEA can be linked with the net national savings in the National Income Accounts to provide an estimate of the growth or diminution of the country’s wealth at the end of the accounting year.
 
Given the expected natural resource and environmental problems, environmental/ ecological economics provides an arsenal of policy tools for addressing these prospects, such as the setting of standards, quotas, allowable practices, permits and deposit requirements, the levy of extraction taxes and pollution charges, direct outlays of public investments, promotion of public-private partnership, and the provision of information, tradeable (permit or property) rights, other regulations, training and capacity-building. The choice and selection of particular policy options or intervention measures is guided by some conceptual considerations and may be firmed up through the application of assessment and evaluation methods. Specifically, the conduct of environmental impact assessment (EIA), cost-benefit analysis (CBA) in the conventional and extended form, and multi-criteria analysis (MCA) can assist decision-making in establishing environmental priorities, as well as provide a rationale for recommending appropriate measures.
 
EC 185.48 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS: MODERN CHINESE ECONOMY
TTH, 3:30 – 5:00 pm, Venue – TBA (Section A)
Mr. Lucio B. Pitlo III
Pre-requisite: None
Course Description: This course is an introduction to the modern Chinese economy focusing on reforms undertaken to move from a centrally-planned to a market-oriented economy, and how it has increasingly integrated itself into the global economy.
 
EC 185.70 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS: SOUTH KOREAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
TH, 5:00 – 8:00 pm, CTC 408 (Section A)
Dr. Ser Percival K. Peña-Reyes
Pre-requisite: EC 102
Course Description: This course provides an overview of the economic development of South Korea from the end of World War II to the present time. It reviews South Korea’s economic development policies, culture, and social value system to explain its success and, more importantly, distill valuable learning insights for the Philippine economy.

ECON 185.71 INTRODUCTION TO BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS
SAT, 9:00 am – 12:00 nn, B 105 (Section A)
Dr. Benjamin E. Radoc Jr.
Pre-requisite: EC 111 & EC 112
Course Description: This course introduces behavioral economics as a field of inquiry that combines psychology and economics. It seeks to present a better understanding of human behavior under conditions of certainty and uncertainty. Selected topics link theory with empirical applications, including business, finance, investment, health, law and public policy.
 

 

GRADUATE ECO ELECTIVES FOR FIRST SEMESTER SY 2018-2019

 
EC 224 HISTORY OF ECONOMICS
MON, 6:00 – 9:00 pm, ECO DEPT (Section A)
Dr. Germelino M. Bautista
Pre-requisite: None
Course Description: The course discusses the evolution of economic ideas and the emergence of various schools of thought. Figure 1 shows the various philosophers and (political-) economic thinkers who have shaped and contributed to the development of a particular school. Though a particular school may have dominated a particular historical period and location, other perspectives and economic ideas have emerged partly in response to existing or changing conditions or in reaction to dominant orthodoxies. Influenced by methodological advances elsewhere and alternative conceptual frameworks, some economic writers have primarily responded to concrete contemporary problems and ongoing debates (policy questions, institutional critiques, current social practices) within their given historical political-economic context.
 
A study of various schools of economic thought would not only help inform and clarify the presence of competing perspectives and theories within the economics discipline. It will also develop an appreciation for the value and relative power of ideas that have enlightened and provided existing justification, if not alternative views to economic and social action.
 
Major social philosophers and economic theorists have introduced and articulated key concepts, such as: trade, (equal) exchange, (use and exchange, surplus) value, natural (just) price, private and social cost, individual and social utility (happiness), the market institution, incomes (in the form of wage, profit, interest, and rent), money, source of wealth (land-nature, labour, savings, capital), property, exploitation, accumulation, specialization, economic fluctuation, crisis, market (dis)equilibrium/ (in)stability, social (dis)order, the State, the Public, and the CommonWealth, (in)justice, and (in)equality. Together with particular propositions (principles) and methodologies, some of these concepts constitute the building blocks of particular perspectives or schools of thought. The absence or omission of particular concepts or the emphasis on others partly account for the differences in schools of thought.
 
EC 285.31/ 385.31 MICROECONOMICS OF COMPETITIVENESS
TUE, 6:00 – 9:00 pm, ECO DEPT (Section A)
Dr. Alvin P. Ang
Pre-requisite: None
Course Description: This course is concerned with the determinants of competitiveness and economic development based on a microeconomic lens. The focus of the course is to look at how strategies of firms, vitality of clusters and quality of business environment provide the basis for competition and ultimately a country or a region’s productivity. The course will cover cities, countries and regions. In particular, it focuses on the role of business as the key driver of competitiveness and economic prosperity. In the final analysis, the course would like to bring into consciousness the need for different stakeholders to work together in order to mount and sustain a competitiveness strategy for a region or a nation. Thus, the course is both a theoretical and practioner oriented one. The course is expected to attract diverse trainings but the purpose is to provide sufficient foundation in industry competition and competitive strategy allowing interested student of development and management to participate. It will make use of the case method, readings and lectures. It requires extensive advance preparation for each class. There will be a major team project on the competitive assessment of a region, city, country or a cluster.
 
 
 
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