News And Events

“God did not make death.”   A reminder, not even gentle, with a terrible eeriness about it, is what we get from the very first line of Wisdom today.   Death is not dealt by God. God is the maker of life. And he does not rejoice over the ruin of what he has made. “For he fashioned all things that they might have being; and the creatures of the world are wholesome, and there is not a destructive drug among them.” This too is Eden’s reminder. God is the genesis of all life. The end of all life is God.   “For God formed man to be imperishable; the image of his own nature he made him.” God meant us to live forever. And not just for the sake of...
I propose three inequalities for our Easter reflection today. The Easter truth of Christ risen in our midst reinforces these inequalities. These inequalities are:                  True > false                Light > dark                Love > death   True > false. We hold this inequality to be true, even if the opposite seems to prevail in our world today. The converse, that true is less than or even equal to false (true <= false), is played out...
Every so often, people confess that they miss mass. In truth, we can be here in full attendance and still miss mass. We miss mass when we miss three important points about the Eucharist. We miss mass if we miss (1) what we are fleeing from, (2) where we are headed (our destination), and (3) the journey itself through the wilderness, from where we came to where we are headed.   First, we miss mass, we miss the point of our gathering today if we forget that the Eucharist has something to do about our deliverance. If we do not see how we are slaves to all sorts of masters, how we ourselves try to lord it over others and enslave each other, how we are bound by our own fears and doubts,...
In this age of GPS (global positioning satellites), we seldom turn to the stars anymore to lead us to where we are going. Admittedly, our smartphone is enough of a locational tool to get us to where we are headed, assuming our destination is just here on earth. If, however, we are going to some galaxy far, far away, we will need the stars again for navigation. On a deeper level, we do still follow stars even if we are not headed for the galaxies. We allow these lights to guide our lives, shape our thoughts and actions, and affect the heading of our dreams. These lights can be people, ideas or teachings, images and icons, or even objects of desire. Some of these stars are pretty but...
The opening Antiphon for today, the Third Sunday of Advent, says: “Gaudete in Domino semper,” “Rejoice in the Lord always”. So today is called Gaudete Sunday, a Sunday of Rejoicing.  The call to rejoicing is echoed in our Second Reading from Thessalonians: “Brothers and Sisters, Rejoice always”. And in our responsorial psalm, Mary’s Magnificat: “My soul rejoices in my God.” Some may feel like asking: “What is there to rejoice about in our country of Extra Judicial Killings, of extended martial law in Mindanao, of corruption at high levels of government, of much darkness and little light?” But if we pause a bit to reflect and go back to the first Christmas, the news we would have...
Simbanggabi 2017 sa Gesu Christmas Eve Mass December 24, Saturday Fr. Jose Ramon T. Villarin, SJ 8:00 pm
We are called to wait during this season of Advent starting today. But we all know that waiting is never fun, not chill. Imagine being stuck in traffic even with Waze or rereading old magazines in a dentist’s office. Feel being on the verge of a basketball championship (“One big fight!”) or looking, looking for the One (“May forever!”).   Waiting can work strange things in us. It can awaken the child in us, making us throw tantrums. We curse other drivers in EDSA or scold the doctor’s receptionist. We question all referee decision against us or listen to sad Sam Smith songs all day long.   And when the waiting takes much too long, it can turn us into grumpy old...
Fr. Romeo J. Intengan S.J. entered the Society of Jesus on 25 April 1970 and was ordained on 27 March 1977.   He was the Provincial Superior of the Society of Jesus in the Philippines from 1998 to 2004.   The wake is at the Oratory of St Ignatius at the Loyola House of Studies, Loyola Heights, Quezon City. Daily Wake Masses are at 8:00 pm.   Funeral Mass will be on Saturday, 14 October 2017 at the Church of the Gesu at 8:00 a.m.   Interment will be at the Sacred Heart Novitiate Jesuit Cemetery, right after the Funeral Mass.
God’s word to us today is simple and clear: we are to be hospitable to those God sends to our life.   From the old French, the word “hospitable” itself means “to receive a guest”, to play host to someone who comes to us from outside.    It is of course all too easy to welcome the visitor who is familiar, the one who belongs to our circle, the one we believe we can trust. In the Gospel, we are told to welcome three kinds of guests who God sends to visit us at various times in our lives. These three are a prophet, a holy person, and the “little one” who asks us for a cup of water.   We are told to welcome the prophet, the one who makes us...
It is harder to listen nowadays. The plethora of channels out there adds to the difficulty. Ironically, instead of being more connected in a wired and flatter world, we find all kinds of disconnection. Nowhere is this seen more readily than in the proliferation of the echo chamber, which is a selfie-contained cavity where most of what you get to hear is your own voice.    You would think that hyperconnectivity would expand the democratic space. And it has. There are more channels out there indeed. We get to read and see and listen to a lot more stuff than ever.  But an unintended consequence of this bonanza is the stream of noise and garbage gushing out into our...