Undergrad Electives

2nd Semester SY 2020-2021

SEMESTRAL

ENLIT 32: LITERATURES OF THE WESTERN WORLD II
Section A - MWF, 3:00-4:00pm (For 2nd Year AB Lit (English) Majors Only)
                   Ms. Ma. Gabriela Martin
Section B - TTH, 3:30-5:00pm
                   Ms. Ma. Gabriela Martin
Section C - TTH, 11:00-12:30pm
                   Mr. Ramon Vicente Sunico
ENLIT 32 surveys the literature of the Euro-American World from the Neoclassical period to the contemporary period. The course focuses on the representative poetry, drama, prose fiction, and nonfiction of the following literary periods: neoclassicism, romanticism, and the various stages of literary production from modernity to the present.
 
 
ENLIT 42 LITERARY AND CULTURAL THEORY II / LIT 112.2: CONTEMPORARY LITERARY CRITICISM
MWF, 4:00-5:00pm (For 2nd Year AB Lit (English) Majors Only)
Ms. Angelica Maria De Asis
ENLIT 42/LIT 112.2 is an introduction to literary theory criticism and theory from the critical schools of the modern and contemporary periods: Russian Formalism, New Criticism, Reader-Response Criticism and Reception Theory, Psychoanalytic Criticism, Marxist Criticism, Feminist Criticism, Queer/Gay and Lesbian Criticism, Structuralism, and Post-structuralism. The course engages and interrogates representative critical texts from each school, and applies them in the analysis of selected literary and/or cultural texts.
 

ENLIT 92 WORLD LITERATURES II: THEORIES AND TRANSNATIONALITIES ACROSS LATIN AMERICA, ASIA, AND AFRICA
Section A – MWF, 1:00-2:00pm (For 3rd Year AB Lit (ENG) Majors Only)
                  Dr. Vincenz Serrano
Section B – MWF 11:00-12:00nn
                  Dr. Vincenz Serrano
This course introduces students to theories, methods, issues, disciplinary engagements, and genealogies in World Literature. This course focuses on: (1) theoretical and methodological concerns and (2) geographical range of World Literature. The theory and method component aims to illuminate concerns relating to the production and circulation of literary and cultural texts; these concerns include, but are not limited to canon formation; aesthetics and literary form; and national and global politics. With respect to World Literature’s geographical dimension, the course will look at areas such as Southeast Asia, South Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Literary texts such as novels, short fiction, poetry, and drama will illuminate the abovementioned topics.
 
 
ENLIT 129 THE DEVELOPMENT OF FICTION
SAT, 8:00-11:00am
Mr. Danilo Francisco Reyes
A reading course on representative fictionists and their selected novels and short stories. It presents a historic-literary survey of major issues in fiction studies and the fundamental debates, arguments, problems, and achievements in this genre.
 
 
ENLIT 162.20 LITERATURE AND IDEAS III: CULTURAL STUDIES (LITERATURE & WRITING: THE BOOK)
TTH, 2:00-3:30pm (10 slots for 3rd Year AB Lit (ENG) Majors)
Mr. Ramon Sunico
This course is an introduction to the wonderful world of the History of the Book. It will involve the study of the origins and development of the book as a material object and as an agent of civilization. Special attention will be paid to Philippine book history and to Philippine literary publishing.
 
 
ENLIT 173 CREATIVE WRITING III: NON-FICTION
THU, 2:00-5:00pm
Dr. Rica Remedios Santos
The course guides the writing of, discusses, and analyzes the students’ original works of non-fiction such as personal essays, journals, and travelogues.
 

LIT 127.2: THIRD WORLD LITERATURE II
TTH, 12:30-2:00PM (For 4th Year AB Lit (ENG) Majors, Non-Lit Majors Seniors Only)
Mr. Maximino Pulan, Jr.
This course is a survey of African, Asian, and Latin American literature from the 1800's to the present. The course will be organized around seven important literary/post-colonial issues rather than according to historical chronology. This will allow the students familiarity with theoretical considerations that are important to the understanding of Third World texts in a world where Western aesthetics are foregrounded. These issues are: representations of the east; the writer as colonial subject; the experience of colonialism; nationalist movements; literature and language; post-modernism and post-colonialism; neocolonialism; the cultural as connected to the political and economic. Both critical and literary texts will be assigned.
 
 
LIT 161: PHILIPPINE LITERATURE IN ENGLISH                  
MWF, 1:00-2:00pm (For Seniors Only)
Mr. Maximino Pulan, Jr.
A study of Philippine literature originally written in English from the early 1900s to the present, locating it within the study of Philippine literature recorded and written in the different languages of the Filipino people.
 

 


3rd QUARTER

ENLIT 22 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE ACROSS THE PROFESSIONS
TTH, 9:30-11:00am (For 1st Year AB Lit (ENG) Majors Only)
Ms. Ivery Del Campo
ENLIT 22 introduces the student to a range of theoretical, methodological, and practical concerns that involves the intersection between literary studies and various disciplinal and professional contexts, including but not limited to the academe, cultural work, the corporate setting, media, law, social science, government, medicine and the natural sciences. Students in this program are trained to enter a specific professional setting with a strong background in literary theory and practices to enhance their critical and analytical thinking, creativity, and research skills.
 
 
ENLIT 72 LITERATURES OF THE PHILIPPINES II: LITERARY AND CULTURAL STUDIES
Section A – MWF 9:00-10:00am (13 Slots for 3rd Year AB Lit (ENG) Majors)
                  Ms. Annette Soriano
Section B – MWF 1:00-2:00pm
                  Ms. Annette Soriano
Set within the context of globalization and its transnational movements, the course examines Philippine literature in various diasporas and the effects of this mobility on categories that include, but are not limited to, identity, nation, subjectivity, ethnicity, and race. Put differently, the course examines—through established and emergent forms of Philippine literature in English and in translation—contesting and complementary Filipino diasporic identities. Discussions are framed by theories of diaspora, representation, globalization, and translation.

ENLIT 164.20 LITERATURE AND IDEAS III: IMPERIAL AND POSTCOLONIAL NESOLOGY
WED, 5:00-8:00pm
Dr. Oscar Campomanes
Nesology is a new interdisciplinary field consisting in “studies of the island-form or of islands and islandness.” This class explores Nesology’s creative approaches to historical, contemporary, and natural phenomena particular to islandic societies like the Philippines, focusing on the history and cultures of Philippine/Filipino-American postcoloniality and American imperial formations. The concept of “island-forms” furnishes us flexible frameworks for examining US empire-building and Filipino/other postcolonial formations in comparative perspective; we compare our experiences of US “insular imperialism,” and resistance to it, with those of former and current American island territories like Hawaii, Guam, Puerto Rico, American Samoa and Belau.
 


4th QUARTER

ENLIT 60 INTRODUCTION TO TRANSLATION
TTH, 12:30-2:00pm (For 2nd Year AB Lit (ENG) Majors Only)
Dr. Charlie Veric
An introduction to the art and practice of translation, as well as the history of translation theory. The course is divided into three parts, hoping to provide an analysis of the process as well as practical advice for intending translators, namely: the theory of translation, the practice of translation, and the appreciation of literary translations as texts. In covering these issues, the course stresses the importance of understanding the unfamiliar and the need to see human experience from as many angles.
 
 
ENLIT 129.60 LITERATURE AND IDEAS I: SPECULATIVE FICTION
MWF, 4:00-5:00pm (5 slots for 3rd Year AB Lit (ENG) – Track A Majors)
MR. ROY TRISTAN AGUSTIN
The course is a student-driven, text-intensive graduate seminar on the different genres of speculative fiction, including different forms of science fiction (hard, soft, u/dystopian, fantasy, time travel, military, horror, feminist, new wave, cyberpunk), superhero fiction, alternate history, magical realism, and supernatural fiction, with the end in view of students producing publishable critical papers focusing on Philippine speculative fiction.