Undergrad Electives

1ST SEMESTER SY 2021-2022

 

ENLIT 31: LITERATURES OF THE WESTERN WORLD I: EUROPE

Section A – WED, 5:00-8:00pm (For Lit Majors only)
                    Ms. Ma. Gabriela Martin
Section B – TTH, 11:00-12:30pm (For Non-Lit Majors)
                    Mr. Ramon Vicente Sunico
Section C – MWF, 1:00-2:00pm (For Non-Lit Majors)
                    Mr. Ramon Vicente Sunico
A survey of the literature of the Western World produced between the 10th century BC and the late 17th century, including representative poetry, drama, prose fiction, and nonfiction from the Ancient World, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance.

ENLIT 71: LITERATURES OF THE PHILIPPINES I: REGION AND NATION
Section A – MWF, 9:00-10:00am (15 slots for Lit Majors)
                   Ms. Annette Soriano
Section B – TTH, 8:00-9:30pm
                   Mr. Roy Tristan Agustin
Section C – MWF, 11:00-12:00nn
                   Mr. Glenn Diaz
A survey course that covers literature from the pre-Hispanic period to the present. It focuses on the literature and culture from different regions and their intersection with the nation and the globe. The course deploys historiography, comparative discourses, and cultural studies lens.

ENLIT 91: WORLD LITERATURES I: GENEALOGIES AND TRANSLATIONS ACROSS EUROPE AND NORTH AMERICA
Section A – MWF, 10:00-11:00am (15 slots for Lit Majors)
                   Dr. Vincenz Serrano
Section B – MWF, 4:00-5:00pm
                   Mr. Mark Anthony Cayanan
This course introduces students to theories, methods, issues, disciplinary engagements, and genealogies in World Literature. This course focuses on: (1) the historical undergirding and (2) the interdisciplinary inflections of World Literature. With respect to historicity, this course looks into the emergence of—and numerous contestations regarding—the field of World Literature, concentrating on, but not exclusive to, figures such as Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Rabindranath Tagore, Erich Auerbach, Edward Said, and Pascale Casanova. With respect to interdisciplinarity, the course looks at World Literature’s complementary and contentious relationships with other disciplines, including, but not limited to, nation studies, translation studies, and postcolonial studies. Literary texts such as novels, short fiction, poetry, and drama will illuminate the abovementioned topics.
 

ENLIT 111.40: ASIAN LITERATURE III: MODERN SOUTH KOREAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION
Section A – TTH, 9:30-11:00am (5 slots for Lit Majors)
                   Dr. Alona Guevarra
Section B – TTH, 3:30-5:00pm (5 slots for Lit Majors)
                   Mr. Raymon Ritumban
This course explores fiction produced in South Korea after 1945 up to the early 2000s when the country economically developed. Through close reading and contextualizing of short stories, novellas and novels by authors like Chae Man-Sik, Cho Se-Hui, Yi Mun-yǒl and Kim Young-Ha, the course shows complex changes in South Korea from its establishment as a democratic republic to its global influence today as a cultural center in Asia and a key player in global economy. Focus is on topics like the development of nationalism and identity as well as the country’s changes within the context of transnationalism and globalization.
 

ENLIT 129: THE DEVELOPMENT OF FICTION
SAT, 8:00-11:00am (3 slots for Lit Majors under Track A and Non-Lit Majors)
Mr. Danilo Francisco Reyes
A reading course on representative fictionists and their selected novels and short stories. It presents a historic-literary survey of major issues in fiction studies and the fundamental debates, arguments, problems, and achievements in this genre.
 

ENLIT 129.93: LITERATURE AND IDEAS I: THE CONTEMPORARY COMING-OF-AGE NOVEL
TTH, 2:00-3:30pm (8 slots for Lit Majors; 15 slots for Non-Lit Majors)
Ms. Ines Erica Bautista-Yao
The coming-of-age novel documents the unique experience of traveling from childhood to personal maturity, typically with a difficult journey away from home. The framework by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe defines the “bildungsroman” as a novel of formation. Using a survey of bildungsroman texts from the late 20th and early 21st century, the course examines the various literary devices used to evoke a character`s departure from the familiar to adulthood. It draws upon the rich tradition of American coming-of-age novels in connection with Philippine bildungsroman stories. Topics include rebellion, identity formation, family, friendship, nationalism, romance, gender dynamics, and more.
 

ENLIT 131.30: LITERATURE AND IDEAS III:  THE PHILIPPINE TELESERYE
MWF, 4:00-5:00pm (8 slots for Lit Majors; 15 slots for Non-Lit Majors)
Dr. Louie Jon Sanchez
This course explores the contemporary soap opera called the “teleserye” in Philippine television in contemporary times. Using cultural studies and media studies frameworks, the exploration is historical, poetic, and aesthetic in nature, and explicates the development of the genre as it was practiced, defined (and re-defined) in the last 30 years, beginning with the return of democratized Philippine television after the 1986 Edsa Revolution, until the most recent "Korean turn." This course is designed for literature majors and minors who wish to engage in Filipino popular cultural texts and communication majors aiming to deepen their understanding of the genre.
 

ENLIT 153: LITERATURE AND ECONOMICS
TTH, 11:00-12:30pm (15 slots for Lit Majors under Track B; 15 slots for Non-Lit Majors)
Mr. Harald Tomintz
This course will examine the critical exchange between literature and economics.  Students will read literary works and theories which focus on issues of authorship and commerce; the homologies between money and language, Mauss’s gift theory as expounded on by Lewis Hyde in contradistinction to market economy and Georges Batailles who expanded the mode of exchange to a theory of erotic commerce; consumerism and commodity culture.