Course Offerings: Second Semester, SY 2021-2022

COURSE OFFERINGS
2nd Semester, SY 2021-2022
(TENTATIVE)

DEV 100.1 A - PERSPECTIVES IN DEVELOPMENT: ECONOMICS
Dr. Leland Joseph R. Dela Cruz (T-Th, 500-630pm) 

» This course introduces the various competing perspectives in the analysis of economic development and underdevelopment, laying the foundation for a critical and theoretically informed
understanding of contemporary issues in Philippine and international development.

Note: All slots for AB DS Majors 

DEV 100.3 A - PERSPECTIVES IN DEVELOPMENT: SOCIOLOGY  
Dr. Jayeel S. Cornelio (Wednesday, 500-800pm) 
» This course provides an overview of various socio-cultural perspective on development and modernization thus laying the ground for a critical and theoretically informed  understanding of
contemporary issues in Philippine.and international development.
Note: All slots for AB DS Majors 

DEV 105i - SURVERY OF SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT APPROACHES
Section A : Anna Mae D. Bautista (T-Th, 1230-200pm) All slots for AB DS Majors 
Section B : Anna Mae D. Bautista (T-Th, 200-330pm) All slots for AB DS Majors 
Section C : Anna Mae D. Bautista (T-Th, 330-500pm) 
All slots for students with Minor in Development & the Law and Development Management
» This course provides an overview of social development approaches used by various development institutions. Inputs from development professionals demonstrate how theses frameworks are applied in practice. It also provides an overview of the evolving concept of poverty from income poverty to poverty as human insecurity.

DEV 107 - PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Section A: Dr. Mark Anthony D. Abenir (T-Th, 930-1100am) for AB DS Majors
Section BDr. Mark Anthony D. Abenir (T-Th, 1100-1230pm) for AB DS Majors
Section C: Emmanuel Joseph B. Solis II (Tuesday, 600-900pm) 
All slots for students with Minor in Development Management and Health & Development
Section DEmmanuel Joseph B. Solis II (Wednesday, 600-900pm) 
All slots for students with Minor in Development Management and Health & Development
» This course provides a practical overview of the cycle of the development process involved in the management of development programs and projects, including project conceptualization,
design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation.
Pre-requisite: DS 130/ DEV 106.1 or any DS 135.xx/ DEV 183.xx or DevMan electives

DEV 109 A - INSTITUTIONS AND DEVELOPMENT
Dr. Leland Joseph R. Dela Cruz (Wednesday, 600-900pm) 

» This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding and appreciation of the different types of institutions and the roles they play in promoting accountable and responsive governance, as well as sustainable, innovative, and inclusive development. These institutions include government agencies, civil society organizatiions, corporations, corporate foundations, and multilateral organizations. The course also aids the students in their process of self-awareness and self-discovery, to help them discern which types of institutions they may be a good fit for. Students will chart their medium and long-term career plans to directly contribute to the strenghtening of institutions and promoting growth and development.

Note: All slots for AB DS Majors

DEV 193.2 - QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS
Section A: Dr. Leslie A. Lopez (T-Th, 1100-1230pm)
Section B: Dr. Leslie A. Lopez (T-Th, 1100-1230pm)
» This course introduces students to the various quantitative methods in the social sciences. The course begins with a discussion of the methodological implications of the use of quantitative
methods. It then proceeds with to a discussion of the various quantitative methods including assessment of their strengths and limitations.
Note: All slots for AB DS Majors

DEV 198.2 - FIELD SPECIALIZATION 
Section A: Dr. Jayeel S. Cornelio / Tutorial / DS Office
Section B: Mary Grace P. Santos / Tutorial / DS Office
Section C: Dr. Leslie A. Lopez / Tutorial / DS Office
Section D: Dr. Mark Anthony D. Abenir / Tutorial / DS Office
Section E: Emmanuel Joseph B. Solis II / Tutorial / DS Office
Section F: Marcia Czarina Corazon M. Medina-Guce / Tutorial / DS Office
Section G: David Alexander D. Laurel / Tutorial / DS Office
Section H: Edwin M. Salonga / Tutorial / DS Office
Section  I: Dr. Segundo Joaquin E. Romero Jr / Tutorial / DS Office
Section J: Anna Mae D. Bautista / Tutorial / DS Office
Section K: Benigno C. Balgos / Tutorial / DS Office
» This course provides a synthesis of the course taken for the AB Development Studies degree program. Students are expected to complete a thesis or a project. This course provides students
with an opportunity to apply the lessons they have learned from their AB Development Studies Program.
Note: Thesis Class 


ELECTIVES

DEV 181.1i A - HUMANITARIAN ACTION IN THE PHILIPPINES
Benigno C. Balgos (T-Th, 330-500pm)
» The course provides an overview of humanitarian work in the Philippines. Inputs from professionals in humanitarian agencies demonstrate the diversity of frameworks and models used in addressing disaster and crisis situations. Discussions also consider the politics of humanitarian work that involves dynamic but also contentious relationships between the state, humanitarian agencies, local communities, and other institutions.
Note: Required subject for the minor in Humanitarian Action. Credited as an elective for Development Management, Health & Development and Urban & Regional Development

DEV 181.5 A - MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE
Dr. Rosette Gilda C. Librea (Wednesday, 600-900pm)
» The course introduces students to the complex challenges of humanitarian actors. Drawing from multiple disciplines, the course enables students to think outside of the boundaries of professional disciplines to strategically arrive at solutions around progmmatic issues of common interests. The course gives attention to specific interventions that illustrate convergence of disciplines for humanitarian work. These cases demonstrate the potential of bridging compartmentalized interventions and strengthening collaboration among disciplines. 
Note: Credited as an elective for Development Management, Health & Development and Humanitarian Action Elective

DEV 183.13 A - SOCIAL MARKETING
Edwin M. Salonga (Thursday, 600-900pm)
» This course is an overview of basic marketing principles and how these can and must be used to support various development interventions. Case studies are analyzed to illustrate the concrete application of social marketing theories.
Note: Credited as an elective for Development Management and Health & Development

DEV 183.16 A - TRAINING MANAGEMENT
Mariel Vincent A. Rapisura (Monday, 630-930pm)
» This course develops knowledge, skills, and capabilities to manage training programs. Focus is on the training management cycle. Deeper appreciation of the course material is facilitated by hands-on learning exercises and an actual training conducted for target groups such as members of people's organizations.
Note: Credited as an elective for Development Management, Health & Development and Urban & Regional Development


DEV 183.24i A - CREATING SHARED VALUE FOR PRACTITIONERS
David Alexander D. Laurel (T-Th, 200-330pm)
» Creating Shared Value (CSV) leverages the resources and influence of private enterprises in uplifting the conditions of disadvantaged groups while creating strategic value for business. Beyond the traditional practice of CSR as philanthropy, CSV results in societal and business impacts that are positive, sustainable, and replicable. This course introduces the student to the CSV framework, reviews concepts that are foundational to understanding and developing CSV strategies, and guides the student in formulating a CSV strategy for a particular organization. The overarching objective is to develop CSV practitioners, giving them a distinct advantage before entering the private of public sectors.
Note: Credited as an elective for Development Management 

DEV 186.14 A - LOCAL GOVERNMENT
Marcia Czarina Corazon M. Median-Guce (Tuesday, 600-900pm))
» This course provides an examination of the theory and practice of local government in the Philippines. Topics include the salient features, implications, and effects of the Local Government Code of 1991 and other legal developments from then on. The class also problematizes the different approaches to decentralization, planning, and local governance. Discussions reflect on the challenges involving the local government in such areas as development planning, the legislative process, democratic participation, and civil society involvement.
Note: Credited as an elective for Development Management, Health & Development, Urban & Regional Development and Development & the Law

DEV 186.34 A - POVERTY STUDIES
Marcia Czarina Corazon M. Medina-Guce (Thursday, 600-900pm)
» This course provides an in-depth analysis of the cause and effects of poverty and the proposed solutions to address it. Drawing on insights from different fields in the social sciences, this course approaches poverty as a complex phenomenon that demands different ways of defining, problematizing, and confronting it. Topics for discussion include poverty as a multidimensional concept, the metrics that have been developed to measure it, and the anti-poverty intiatives that have been adopted in different contexts. The course also critically reflects on poverty as a social, political, and economic reality.
Note: Credited as an elective for Development Management and Urban & Regional Development

DEV 186.44 A - ISSUES IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
Dr. Rosette Gilda C. Librea (Friday, 630-930pm)
» This is an in-depth review of sustainable development. Topics include the dialectical impact of population, urbanization, poverty, and markets on sustainable development. Interventions for sustainable development are assessed.
NoteCredited as an elective for Development Management, Humanitarian Action and Urban & Regional Development

DEV 187.3i A - INTRODUCTION TO URBAN & REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Dr. Segundo Joaquin E. Romero Jr. (T-Th, 1100-1230pm)
» Using a historical and cross-country perspective, this course will familiarize the student with the geospatial aspects of development, with emphasis on the features and processes that have constituted human settlements through the ages, culminating in the contemporary city. By learning key concepts of geography and urban planning, the student will gain the appreciation of economic, social, and physical considerations that are necessary for producing vibrant urban areas, as well as those conditions that drive current phenomena like suburbanization and the proliferation of informal settlements. Whenever applicable, Philippine examples are used in discussion, to compare against historical urban dynamics in other nation-states and eras.
Note: Required subject for the minor in Urban & Regional Development. Credited as an elective for Development Management and Humanitarian Action 

DEV 189.8 - THE POLITICAL ECOOMY OF HEALTH & DEVELOPMENT
Section A: Errom C. Medina (T-Th, 930-1100am) All slots for BS HSc students
Section B: Errom C. Medina (T-Th, 1100-1230pm) All slots for BS HSc students
Section C: Errom C. Medina (T-Th, 200-330pm) All slots for BS HSc students
Section D: Errom C. Medina (T-Th, 330-500pm) All slots for students with Minor in Health & Development and Development & the Law
» This course situates public health issues in the broader discourses of development and governance. It places concern for public health in the context of various development strategies in order to
provide students with a critical understanding of how public health issues interact and are made to interact with other social concerns. It also provides perspectives on the various agents of
development and public health management. These perspectives help create a realistic appreciation of the role played by these institutions in public health management.
Note: Required subject for the minor in Health & Development. Credited as an elective for Development & the Law